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OFFLINE   Travis #1

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 10:51 PM

QUOTE
Live interactive role for Jones
Amanda Meade | February 07, 2008
LATELINE host Tony Jones has scored a live and interactive public affairs program to host each week.

Jones will host a weekly program on ABC1 called Q&A, which will be filmed live in front of a studio audience.

And viewers will be able to participate via mobile phones and email, the ABC said.

Next Wednesday, Jones will also host the ABC's live coverage of the Stolen Generations apology in parliament.

ABC director of TV Kim Dalton last night said the ABC planned to give viewers more choice in 2008.

"We are helping to reshape the way people use and interact with TV by giving them more programs, more ways to view them and more flexibility around when and how to watch them," he said.


Source:http://www.theaustra...1-30540,00.html
Sounds Good.

OFFLINE   TGIF #2

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Posted 14 February 2008 - 04:21 PM

Sounds like Difference of Opinion - with something like this they know they can't be accused of bias by the News commentariat.

OFFLINE   Cyril Washbrook #3

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Posted 14 February 2008 - 10:41 PM

Well, I think it was actively proposed as the replacement for Difference of Opinion.

OFFLINE   Mike Retter #4

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Posted 11 May 2008 - 11:18 AM

Apparently the first episode of this will be with the Prime Minister for the whole program. The questions are asked by the audience. After the first episode the normal format will be a panel of politicians etc who are asked questions from the public. The first episode will be just Kevin Rudd. If the program goes for an hour that is quite an interesting situation Kevin has got him self into. The other interesting thing about this new show is it goes to air live.

OFFLINE   SA TV #5

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Posted 11 May 2008 - 06:02 PM

I hope the audience goes through some vetting prior to coming on....

OFFLINE   curious #6

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Posted 11 May 2008 - 06:31 PM

QUOTE (retter2critical @ May 11 2008, 11:18 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Apparently the first episode of this will be with the Prime Minister for the whole program. The questions are asked by the audience. After the first episode the normal format will be a panel of politicians etc who are asked questions from the public. The first episode will be just Kevin Rudd. If the program goes for an hour that is quite an interesting situation Kevin has got him self into. The other interesting thing about this new show is it goes to air live.


Any firm dates on its premiere?

OFFLINE   Jeffmister #7

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Posted 11 May 2008 - 06:33 PM

QUOTE (curious @ May 11 2008, 06:31 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Any firm dates on its premiere?


There was a pilot episode that went to air LIVE last Thursday night (via abc.net.au/qanda only), but the series starts Thursday May 22nd at 9:30pm (LIVE - AEST)


OFFLINE   Mike Retter #8

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Posted 11 May 2008 - 08:49 PM

QUOTE (SA TV @ May 11 2008, 06:02 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I hope the audience goes through some vetting prior to coming on....



I hope so too. I remember with The Great Global warming Swindle after-show-discussion (also hosted by Tony Jones) the audience was stacked with wackos’ such as several members of the Citizens Electoral Council which is that cult like organisation that worships the political views of Lyndon Larouche.



OFFLINE   Mike Retter #9

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Posted 11 May 2008 - 09:03 PM

QUOTE (curious @ May 11 2008, 06:31 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Any firm dates on its premiere?


Starting Thursday May 22, 9:30pm

You can post questions for the show on the website

http://www.abc.net.au/tv/qanda/

OFFLINE   Sam #10

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Posted 11 May 2008 - 09:50 PM

I hope they have some guy reapetedly standing up saying the word crap like on aca on fast forward

OFFLINE   Tom W #11

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Posted 11 May 2008 - 10:18 PM

Why the hell wasn't this online pilot promoted much!

Anyway, with Tony Jones in the chair, I have no doubt this show will be second to none!

OFFLINE   Mike Retter #12

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Posted 11 May 2008 - 11:11 PM

QUOTE (smartuser @ May 11 2008, 10:18 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Why the hell wasn't this online pilot promoted much!

Anyway, with Tony Jones in the chair, I have no doubt this show will be second to none!


I think they should publicise it a bit more. I did not know about the online pilot. The program could find a wide audience, which would be a good thing to encourage public engagement in issues. Difference Of Opinion had that quality. DOO had the slogan at the end of each episode “Speak up”. It also had a resident cartoonist, which was occasionally interesting. Hopefully Tony will stop the Politicians from skirting round the questions from the audience.



OFFLINE   SA TV #13

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Posted 12 May 2008 - 10:32 AM

QUOTE (smartuser @ May 11 2008, 10:48 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Why the hell wasn't this online pilot promoted much!


it's not the actual show, it was just a test...

OFFLINE   Tranquility #14

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Posted 12 May 2008 - 07:59 PM

QUOTE (retter2critical @ May 11 2008, 11:11 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Difference Of Opinion had that quality.

No, it was the most boring, cerebral program ever on Australian TV. There was no debate or any real difference of opinion.
Tranquility | Forum Moderator and The Spy Report Editor
Media Spy | tranquility@mediaspy.org | mediaspy.org

OFFLINE   Mike Retter #15

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Posted 12 May 2008 - 08:16 PM

Difference Of Opinion

QUOTE (Tranquility @ May 12 2008, 08:59 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
No, it was the most boring, cerebral program ever on Australian TV. There was no debate or any real difference of opinion.


Difference Of Opinion

I don’t think the format was perfect but I disagree that there was no debate or difference of opinion. I got to see almost every episode and there was always difference among the panel members. On the whole it was a substantial program.

OFFLINE   Mike Retter #16

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Posted 13 May 2008 - 06:09 PM

The following is from the Q and A website www.abc.net.au/tv/qanda

Tony Jones is one of Australia's most respected journalists. As host of ABC TV's new live public affairs program Q&A he brings over 20 years of award winning journalism to the table.

Tony is known for his incisive and probing interviews on the breaking issues of the day. His role on Q&A will capitalise on his ability to tap into the political zeitgeist and keep the discussion focused and on track.

Tony Jones has won pretty much every award an Australian journalist could wish for. He's covered the seminal news events of the last two decades - from the fall of communism in Eastern Europe, through the collapse of apartheid in South Africa, to the rise of the Taliban and, closer to home, the revelations of sexual abuse in remote Aboriginal communities.

Now with Q&A Tony is embarking on a new kind of inquiry.

He wants to put the Australian public directly in touch with the politicians and playmakers - to give them the opportunity to get some answers, eye to eye.

Public democracy, open dialogue, transparency - it's what every good journalist strives for.

This must be serious if he is giving up time he would usually spend on Lateline



OFFLINE   Tom W #17

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Posted 13 May 2008 - 07:15 PM

I watched the first episode and it was really great, much better than difference of opinion - the politicians were even a little playful with the audience!
I would just recommend they get a little more intelligent audience though...

OFFLINE   Splashmo #18

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Posted 13 May 2008 - 07:19 PM

QUOTE (smartuser @ May 13 2008, 06:45 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I would just recommend they get a little more intelligent audience though...

It should be a cross-section of society, not your AB professionals.

OFFLINE   Mike Retter #19

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Posted 17 May 2008 - 05:00 PM

Excerpt from article "Power to the people, log on" by Graeme Blundell in the Weekend Australian Review -

Recognising the changed environment, the ABC, under experienced producer Peter McEvoy, has developed Q&A, an hour-long interactive public affairs program. And a timely experiment in public democracy it is, too. Each week, Lateline's Tony Jones will wrangle with five panellists facing questions on topical issues from an invited studio audience as well as from viewers, who can send in their questions via the internet or by SMS. "We'll pluck the best out of the stream and pass them in to the live show through a producer and on to Tony," McEvoy says. He says the panel will feature a broad range of personalities, from the sort of commentators who appear on The Insiders to the smart, sneering mouths that could once be heard on The Glass House. "I think all journalism should be relevant and engaging: big-issue stuff should grab our attention," McEvoy says. People who fancy themselves as entertaining inquisitors and political agitators can register on the show's website, deposit some general information and hopefully await a producer's call. "We are after an audience who comes along not simply to watch but to participate; that's the game," McEvoy says.

What he is working from is the idea that in the era of blogging consumers are demanding more independence and power from TV. Consequently, news consumption is fast becoming less of a prepared, pious-sounding lecture and more of an open dialogue. And, increasingly, the role of the TV journalist will be that of an authenticator and interpreter rather than a gatekeeper of knowledge. Jones is an inspired choice for this role. He's one of the few TV journalists able to sort through an avalanche of information and identify what we might be able to trust. He is also the suavest presenter on the box, with a James Spader kind of insouciance. Many women of my acquaintance tell me they admire his polished assurance and dextrous articulateness. As a performer he certainly embodies a sense of the authentic mind, something we rarely see on local TV.He understands implicitly that the key to success lies in making viewers believe they are on a footing, with the greatest intimacy, with everything and everybody.Just watching him work is entertaining. He makes all sorts of calculations and computations on the run, often mid-sentence, without seeming to engage the main parts of his brain. Then he announces with that sardonic half-smile the results of his deliberations as though they were self-evident.I've always admired the way he allows his quick mind to pantomime an incapacity for accepting simple conclusions. "Let's look at this, then, shall we?" he will suddenly snap. Or: "I'm sorry, this is not the argument here." You always know he's getting dead serious when he suddenly says, "Let's not mince words, shall we?"Jones will need his full repertoire of broadcast tricks on Q&A, which McEvoy admits might turn out to be full-on interactive studio madness. Many programs have tried to incorporate viewers' contributions, McEvoy says, but they have generally been entertainment shows such as Big Brother and Australian Idol. "But for us the possibility presents the opportunity to get the show out of the studio into a broader audience, and offers accessibility to those watching from home," he says.This is the big experiment for McEvoy, and he is after an urgency, immediacy and topicality not found in other current affairs shows. "Though it's a case of let's start and see what happens," he says slowly, aware of the risks he runs, especially on the legal front. I'm looking forward to his show. We've never really had a chance as viewers to say, live on TV, "I'm as mad as hell, and I'm not going to take it any more."
Q&A, Thursday, 9.35pm, ABC. http://www.abc.net.au/quanda

http://www.theaustra...5015662,00.html



OFFLINE   hrh #20

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Posted 17 May 2008 - 05:19 PM

"And viewers will be able to participate via mobile phones and email, the ABC said"

Also after reading about it in today's TV mag I am wondering how they will get viewers in places where it isn't shown live to participate?!!?!

Probably much the same way as when 60 Minutes say at the end "and waiting online to answer your questions" it is all over and done even before the show has started in WA.