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News International phone-hacking and corruption scandal


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OFFLINE   Cyril Washbrook #21

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Posted 29 January 2011 - 01:29 PM

... mind you, it is now getting coverage in the major Australian newspapers now as well, which is reassuring. ;)

The Spy Report:

A journalist for the News of the World may have been hacking phones within the last year, according to court documents disclosed this week from a civil case being brought against the paper's owner.




OFFLINE   Cyril Washbrook #22

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Posted 19 February 2011 - 08:13 PM

The Spy Report:

Voicemail messages illegally obtained from the phones of public figures were given to multiple journalists at the News of the World, according to the private investigator convicted for hacking phones while working for the tabloid.



OFFLINE   Cyril Washbrook #23

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Posted 27 February 2011 - 10:39 AM

Mulcaire's again been ordered to name names.

The Spy Report:

The private investigator at the centre of the News of the World phone-hacking scandal was ordered by the High Court on Friday to name the individuals who instructed him to hack into public figures' voicemail messages.

Mr Justice Vos ruled that Glenn Mulcaire - who was jailed in 2007 for hacking into royal household phones on behalf of the tabloid's royal editor - could not rely on the danger of self-incrimination as a justification for refusing to give evidence in response to a series of questions put by alleged victims of phone-hacking.



OFFLINE   Cyril Washbrook #24

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 07:34 PM

You could arguably lop off the "phone-" from this scandal. Panorama says that Alex Marunchak, the former Irish editor of the News of the World, received hacked emails from a private detective. This follows the weekend's revelation that Jonathan Rees, a known supplier of all sorts of illegally-obtained information, was re-hired by the paper in 2005 after he came out of prison.

The Spy Report:

A senior editor at the News of the World obtained hacked emails from a private investigator while working at the tabloid, according to a documentary to be aired later today.

The BBC's Panorama programme will tonight allege that Alex Marunchak, a former News of the World senior executive editor, received a series of emails obtained from the account of an ex-army intelligence officer in July 2006. The private detective who obtained the emails reportedly used a trojan virus sent in an email in order to gain access, before faxing the messages to Marunchak.



OFFLINE   Cyril Washbrook #25

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 10:34 AM

Probably boring news to anyone who isn't fascinated by the hacking scandal (I'm guessing that applies to most ;)), but the Metropolitan Police's acting deputy commissioner appeared before a parliamentary committee and stood by remarks implying that the DPP had himself misled Parliament over the phone-hacking scandal.

The Spy Report:

John Yates, the acting deputy commissioner of the Metropolitan Police, has denied allegations that he misled Parliament about the extent of phone-hacking at the News of the World, implying instead that the director of public prosecutions had made misleading statements.

Yates appeared before the House of Commons culture select committee on Thursday to defend himself against claims that he had "deliberately or inadvertently" misled the home affairs committee in relation to activities at the News International tabloid.



OFFLINE   Cyril Washbrook #26

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Posted 06 April 2011 - 12:53 AM

Regardless of whether you've been following the phone-hacking scandal, this is big news. A former News of the World senior executive and the paper's current chief reporter were arrested a few hours ago in relation to illegal voicemail interceptions.

The Spy Report:

A former News of the World senior executive and the tabloid's current chief reporter have been arrested on suspicion of unlawfully intercepting voicemail messages.

The Metropolitan Police said in a statement on Tuesday that two men had been arrested after separately attending police stations in London. Police did not name the individuals, but they have subsequently been identified as Ian Edmondson, 42, and Neville Thurlbeck, 50.



OFFLINE   Cyril Washbrook #27

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Posted 09 April 2011 - 11:57 AM

Major development today: NI has apologised to some victims of phone-hacking and will offer compensation to eight litigants. But note... "some" victims of phone-hacking. It's still contesting other cases: the number of cases being brought stands at 24, and the number of potential victims runs into the thousands.

The Spy Report:

The News of the World has finally conceded that the phone-hacking scandal embroiling the paper was more widespread than previously claimed, apologising to eight litigants and announcing that it would set up a fund to compensate some of the victims.

News International, the paper's publisher, made the calculated admission in a statement issued on Friday afternoon. It also conceded that its own initial investigations into phone-hacking allegations had been flawed.

By accepting liability and offering an apology in certain cases, the Murdoch-owned tabloid is belatedly seeking to mitigate the damage from the ongoing phone-hacking affair, which is currently subject to a Metropolitan Police investigation, a string of civil proceedings, and ongoing scrutiny from a number of MPs.



OFFLINE   Cyril Washbrook #28

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Posted 14 May 2011 - 11:57 AM

Sienna Miller will accept the payout.

The Spy Report:

The British actor Sienna Miller will receive £100,000 ($A150,000) in compensation from the publisher of the News of the World, after the tabloid unconditionally admitted liability for claims relating to the hacking of her phone messages.

Miller's decision to accept the compensation and a private disclosure of wrongdoing from News Group Newspapers (NGN), a subsidiary of the Murdoch-owned News International, means that the publisher will avoid the possibility of damaging revelations coming out in court.

The £100,000 payout is drawn from the compensation fund set up by News International last month, following its admission of liability for claims made by eight litigants, including Miller, in relation to alleged phone-hacking at the News of the World.



OFFLINE   Cyril Washbrook #29

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Posted 05 July 2011 - 01:23 PM

I think the News of the World phone hacking scandal has hit a new low, if that's possible.

The Spy Report:

The News of the World phone hacking scandal has taken its most unpleasant turn yet, after it emerged that the British tabloid may have illegally hacked into the phone of a missing schoolgirl who was later found dead.

The Guardian said on Monday that the Metropolitan Police was investigating evidence that the paper's journalists intercepted Milly Dowler's mobile phone messages shortly after she went missing in March 2002.

It is alleged that when the 13-year-old's voicemail inbox became full, the journalists opted to delete several messages left in the wake of her disappearance in order to make way for new ones: interfering with the police investigation by destroying potential evidence, and giving Milly's family false hope that she might still have been alive.

And the clincher, from The Guardian's investigation, is this bit:

The Dowler family then granted an exclusive interview to the News of the World in which they talked about their hope, quite unaware that it had been falsely kindled by the newspaper's own intervention. Sally Dowler told the paper: "If Milly walked through the door, I don't think we'd be able to speak. We'd just weep tears of joy and give her a great big hug."



OFFLINE   tamago_otoko #30

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Posted 05 July 2011 - 03:16 PM

I seriously couldn't believe this when I read it, just terrible conduct. What did the journalists hope to achieve in this case specifically by doing what they did?
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OFFLINE   Cyril Washbrook #31

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Posted 05 July 2011 - 03:33 PM

I seriously couldn't believe this when I read it, just terrible conduct. What did the journalists hope to achieve in this case specifically by doing what they did?

The revelations today have to be viewed in light of a firmly entrenched culture shared by an unspecified number of tabloid reporters. For these individuals, it is not just viewed as acceptable to undertake this kind of activity, but it becomes an essential and perhaps unthinking part of day-to-day "journalistic" activity.

The Guardian, The Independent, and The Daily Telegraph are all leading with the phone hacking story this morning. To its credit, News Corp's The Times also has the story on its front page, although it's squished into the RHS column.

But as the BBC's Nick Lawrence pointed out on Twitter, five tabloids that routinely featured the Milly Dowler story on their front pages in 2002 have decided not to lead with the hacking revelation today. "Speaks volumes."

OFFLINE   dbrmuz #32

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Posted 06 July 2011 - 05:31 PM

Wow,the story's gone mainstream-it's on Ten News right now. :eyepopping:
If I agreed with you we'd both be wrong

OFFLINE   Cyril Washbrook #33

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Posted 06 July 2011 - 07:08 PM

It should be on every news bulletin, I'd argue. This story is spiralling out of control. Even those tabloids that shamefully decided not to run with the story on Tuesday morning are running with it on their front pages today...

... well, with one exception. See if you can spot the odd one out.

Here's just a select few of the latest developments, some of which I've elaborated on in The Spy Report.
  • Police believe that some of the families of 2005 London bombing victims had their phones targeted.
  • The parents of Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman, the victims of the Soham murders, have been contacted in connection with the scandal.
  • Glenn Mulcaire, the private investigator at the centre of the scandal, has apologised for his activities and accepts that he deserves to be vilified.
  • The House of Commons will tonight debate the phone hacking affair in the wake of the Milly Dowler revelations and all that has emerged in the 48 hours since.
  • Among the issues to be discussed will be a public inquiry into the hacking scandal.
  • One company, Ford, has withdrawn advertising from the News of the World and others are considering their options.
  • News International has handed over evidence suggesting that the News of the World paid police for information between 2003 and 2007. A number of commentators are accusing NI of trying to deflect attention from possible crimes under the earlier editorship of Rebekah Brooks.
  • Enraged pigeons are among those calling for a boycott of the News of the World.
Bottom line is - the scale of this scandal is utterly mind-blowing.

OFFLINE   Cyril Washbrook #34

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Posted 07 July 2011 - 01:02 AM

To the extent that it's possible to post a "round-up" of such a dynamic news event, I've summed up some of the ongoing developments from the last 12 hours in The Spy Report. Eighteen advertisers have pulled out and pressure is mounting for intervention on the News Corp-Sky deal.

For round-the-clock details, see The Grauniad's excellent live blog.

A short time ago, said newspaper reported that News International has a cracker of a defence for its embattled chief executive Rebekah Brooks. It says... wait for it... she was on holiday when the hacking took place. NI will say that she was in Italy when Milly Dowler's phone was hacked, and that she was also away when the parents of the Soham girls had their phones hacked. Full story here.

OFFLINE   Cyril Washbrook #35

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Posted 07 July 2011 - 08:27 PM

Glenn Mulcaire in happier times.


Brooks and Coulson fronting a parliamentary committee in 2003.


Meanwhile, some investors have been spooked.

EDIT: In breaking news, the Royal British Legion - the armed services charity - has cut the News of the World loose as its campaigning partner, after reports emerged that the paper may have hacked into phones belonging to the relatives of dead armed service personnel.

OFFLINE   Cyril Washbrook #36

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Posted 08 July 2011 - 01:52 AM

The News of the World is dead: News International is closing the paper and this Sunday's edition will be the last.

The story in The Spy Report.

The full statement from James Murdoch.

I'll have more in the morning. I don't know what I'm doing up this late.

OFFLINE   newtaste #37

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Posted 08 July 2011 - 06:04 AM

Speculation that 'The Sun on Sunday' will replace NOTW.

http://telegraph.co....nday-rises.html

OFFLINE   PZ. #38

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Posted 08 July 2011 - 07:06 AM

The News of the World is dead: News International is closing the paper and this Sunday's edition will be the last.

I'd say that last paper will be worth a fair bit of coin given that publications started in 1843 :twocents:

OFFLINE   Johnson28 #39

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Posted 08 July 2011 - 08:46 AM

Wow the News of the World began in 1843? :eyepopping: I thought it only began in the 1950s :tongue:
I heard former British deputy PM John Prescott on CNN (via ABC NewsRadio) this morning saying he was not happy with the closure as the rest of the paper's staff was made the scapegoats when the executives (including Rebekah) are still working.

OFFLINE   PZ. #40

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Posted 08 July 2011 - 08:54 AM

Wow the News of the World began in 1843? :eyepopping: I thought it only began in the 1950s :tongue:

Key in "News of the World" into Wikipedia and you'll see the first copy ;)