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OFFLINE   NewsWorld #1

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Posted 16 May 2005 - 02:30 PM

Something that's bound to excite Mark... BBC World has new look weather.
The maps animate now and the colours are a little different mainly beige and blue.
I thought there was generally a "lighter" look to graphics... more white when listing city by city forecasts

OFFLINE   fox1 #2

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Posted 16 May 2005 - 02:36 PM

what's the go with the 'Earth TV' stuff. yes very impressive, but how the hell does it work!!! and is there an Aussie cam!

i only saw a few seconds of it once... looks so good it looks almost as if cameraguys are working these things!
"channel 10. first in news and current affairs!"

OFFLINE   NewsWorld #3

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Posted 16 May 2005 - 02:45 PM

what's the go with the 'Earth TV' stuff. yes very impressive, but how the hell does it work!!! and is there an Aussie cam!

i only saw a few seconds of it once... looks so good it looks almost as if cameraguys are working these things!

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Earth TV is great!
It's a private service that broadcasters can buy from a German company.
It was being distributed via the APTN satellite network.. not sure if that's still the case though.
Check it out here
They offer various services; the live cams that BBC uses... there's also a time lapse option which looks great too.
They say they're adding cameras all the time... but when I looked into it for a broadcaster there weren't that many in Asia-Pacific.

OFFLINE   K #4

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Posted 16 May 2005 - 03:04 PM

The new look weather is also on BBC TV in the UK. From the previews I have seen (from Weatherscape's website (the software that is used (created by the Meteorological Service of New Zealand Ltd's company Metra)) and from videos that are posted at www.tvforum.co.uk from UK region's previews of the graphics last Friday), they are alright but the lack of symbols on the maps could cause confusion.

The Metra news story on the BBC using their software is at http://www.weathersc...eatherscape.php

Edited by kenneth, 16 May 2005 - 03:05 PM.


OFFLINE   Mr Q #5

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 10:16 PM

I notice that BBC World has now started doing "Business Weather" updates. I've just seen one at just before quarter past the hour, inserted into an ad break. CNN has been doing "Business Traveller Advisories" for a while now on their rolling news programmes, such as CNN Today.
Awake and Alert - but never alarmed.

OFFLINE   ehben #6

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Posted 18 May 2005 - 06:53 AM

just in regards to the BBC's new weather graphics, I thought you might all be interested by the huge storm (excuse the pun) it has caused. It was front page news in The Times this morning, about the backlash.

Read about it on http://news.bbc.co.u...and/4556025.stm

I thought it was very funny, as I'm sure the graphics are no different than what Seven and nine have been doing for years. I think Seven Melbourne started off using them in 1998 or something. Flying through the clouds.

"The Biggest Revolution in 20 years" says the BBC. Yeah whatever. I tell you, for all its good points, Britain can really make me laugh somtimes. 248 people phoned the BBC to compain about the graphics. Even more humourous .. 8 people phoned the BBC to compliment them over the graphics.

I remember standing in the ABC reception a few years back on work experience. it was just after the news, and the phones were hot with compliments on the news reader's hair style!

Jeez!
And now the news...

OFFLINE   fox1 #7

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Posted 18 May 2005 - 12:45 PM

yeah... dunno, the Scotland people have a point... (China routinely distorts just about every map you ever see in the country whether it's in a school, on TV, in a travel agent, bookstore....America looks absolutely tiny, but that's another story)

i dunno... the BBC generally does things mighty well, you gotta say. (Well maybe apart from the whole BBC World look but anyway)... it does look good. You would feel pissed in the greater north though, from that cap.. ;)and yeah, they wouldn't do the same the other way around...

this guy has a point:
"Our 'green and pleasant land' has become muddy brown, what we normally associate as sky blue is now rain, which would be better grey, it's all a bit of a mix-up

I don't think the graphics are close to the best I've seen
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OFFLINE   NewsWorld #8

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Posted 24 May 2005 - 01:03 AM

BBC World is simulcasting News24 today due to strike action in the UK.

Quite interesting... lots of domestic UK news and the we're seeing the domestic ticker as well.

As far as set and graphics are concerned it's just like the overnight news (UK time) which is simulcast everyday

OFFLINE   Mr Q #9

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Posted 24 May 2005 - 09:24 PM

It's really quite strange seeing all the goings on at the BBC over this strike, and looking at how they handled it. There are certainly some very narky people on TV Forum who are extremely critical of those presenters who came in to anchor the BBC's news coverage for the day... I mean, personally, I think the BBC needs to go on a huge cost-cutting drive - it's like an overgrown bush that people should have been trimming on a regular basis, but instead have just let it grow and grow and grow and grow - and now it's so big, you need to take a hacksaw to, to bring it back down to size. But then public service broadcasting takes on a very different meaning in the UK, and much of Europe, than it does here on in the US.

Nevertheless, purely from a presentational point of view - I actually can't recall witnessing a TV media strike. This was clearly a very successful strike - largely due to the fact it was three unions co-ordinating their efforts together, to maximise the impact. Mind you, the fact that the BBC were still able to carry on probably indicates they've got too many managers around the country - many were drafted in to present regional bulletins, and operate the cameras and galleries! :))
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OFFLINE   ehben #10

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Posted 25 May 2005 - 01:17 AM

Im afriad I'll have to disagree. According to The Guardian, raitngs went up for BBC News programs yesterday, during the strike! Newsnight was replaced with a doco about Rome, which rated higher than Newsnight did last Monday.

There's another 48 hour strike planned for next week.

And in terms of a strike, remember the ABC strike last year in Melbourne over the sport decision...?
And now the news...

OFFLINE   Mr Q #11

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Posted 25 May 2005 - 02:13 PM

Im afriad I'll have to disagree. According to The Guardian, raitngs went up for BBC News programs yesterday, during the strike! Newsnight was replaced with a doco about Rome, which rated higher than Newsnight did last Monday.

There's another 48 hour strike planned for next week.

And in terms of a strike, remember the ABC strike last year in Melbourne over the sport decision...?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Indeed - I forgot about that one... Mind you, I'm not a regular ABC News viewer... The difference, I suppose, is that the BBC has a major news operation, and is regularly the ratings leader both with network bulletins and rolling news operations.
Awake and Alert - but never alarmed.

OFFLINE   fox1 #12

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Posted 25 May 2005 - 08:02 PM

i remember... the BBC have had industrial action since the dawn of time. I remember one way back when management were reading 10-minute One o'clock, Six o'clock and Nine o'clock news..

and speaking of...: there was the legendary industrial action at ITV TV-am when Bruce Gyngell directed in the control room, and for anybody who likes 'technical errors' it was like mana!
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OFFLINE   Big Dan #13

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Posted 02 June 2005 - 01:36 PM

It's from a local BBC news bulletin...apparently it was the weather girl's last day, and they've decided to muck up a little...it caused an uproar, even though the places are real!
eek.gif eyepopping.gif biggrin.gif

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OFFLINE   Tom #14

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Posted 02 June 2005 - 02:01 PM

QUOTE (Big_Dan @ Jun 2 2005, 01:36 PM)
It's from a local BBC news bulletin...apparently it was the weather girl's last day, and they've decided to muck up a little...it caused an uproar, even though the places are real!
eek.gif  eyepopping.gif  biggrin.gif



:laughing: laugh.gif silly.gif

ONLINE   Blue Mountains #15

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Posted 02 June 2005 - 03:30 PM

THAT IS HILARIOUS cheerful.gif cheerful.gif cheerful.gif
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OFFLINE   Moses #16

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Posted 25 June 2005 - 12:03 PM

I'm not sure I like the idea of BBC delaying live coverage of distressing news. I understand it's only 6 seconds or something, but I don't know, it just sounds a little bit eh..

OFFLINE   Mr Q #17

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Posted 25 June 2005 - 02:25 PM

QUOTE (winnewstoowoomba @ Jun 25 2005, 12:03 PM)
I'm not sure I like the idea of BBC delaying live coverage of distressing news. I understand it's only 6 seconds or something, but I don't know, it just sounds a little bit eh..

I have my concerns as well, but then again, do viewers really want to be exposed to somebody blowing their brains out? In some cases, footage could be too graphic that it becomes damaging to the viewer. In fact, there could be a case to be made that any broadcaster would be negligent in its responsibilities to viewers if it fails to take reasonable precautions to protect them from such events.
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OFFLINE   Moses #18

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Posted 25 June 2005 - 03:19 PM

I understand their concern, but I still don't know. If someone is finding the footage too distressing they shoudl switch the TV off, or change channels, or close their eyes. News networks and there to provide a window to the world, not a five second edited "live" feed.

OFFLINE   NewsWorld #19

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Posted 25 June 2005 - 03:28 PM

QUOTE (winnewstoowoomba @ Jun 25 2005, 01:19 PM)
I understand their concern, but I still don't know. If someone is finding the footage too distressing they shoudl switch the TV off, or change channels, or close their eyes. News networks and there to provide a window to the world, not a five second edited "live" feed.

Video footage is subjected to judgement calls all the time.
There is a tonne of material that we never see each day for all sorts of reasons.
The standards vary depending on where you are in the world and local sensitivities.
The BBC has taken this decision because technology and competition has meant almost instantaneous turnaround of material not to mention live coverage.
In the past producers and editors would get to see the material first... now you have a situation where you sometimes put a news agency direct to air without knowing what's coming.
Because those agency are providing material to all regions of the world, some of the footage may breach a particular network's standards.

OFFLINE   MelbourneTV #20

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Posted 25 June 2005 - 04:09 PM

I'd rather the full story than edited highlights.... to quote Sky News.